Friday, June 10, 2016

Packing List - Overnight Hiking Trip with Snow

Packing List


Lay it out. Pack it up.
Here is what I took on a 5 day, 4 night backcountry trip. I would say it worked out pretty well (surprisingly - I'm a notorious over packer). The most unexpectedly enjoyable/well used items were: Scarf, two water bottles (vs one), pen and paper and crampons.

I will definitely reference this list again!

Kitchen
  1. Stove & shield
  2. Stove Fuel
  3. One 2-person pot
  4. Knife (not a multi-tool)
  5. Multi-tool (I didn't use)
  6. Spork
  7. Fair Share Mug
  8. Two water bottles (2L worth of water total; 1-1.5L, 1-0.5L)
  9. Wash Cloth
  10. Camp Suds
  11. Waterproof matches & lighter
  12. Water purification system
  13. Rope for hanging food
  14. Food
Clothing
  1. Extra pair(s) of underwear - brought one merino wool one - amazing!
  2. Long underwear (top and bottom)
  3. 3 pairs of socks (1 - wool, 1 - hiking, 1 - silk liner)
  4. Sports bra
  5. Non-cotton long leggings 
  6. Merino wool T-shirt - I like t-shirts so my backpack straps don't rub my skin
  7. Long sleeve base layer - I use my lulu lemon running shirt 
  8. Mid-weight base/mid layer
  9. Light puffy (non-down filled) sweater 
  10. Rain Pants
  11. Gore-tex shell
  12. Hiking boots (not waterproof but comfortable)
  13. Gaiters (I used short ones)
  14. Scarf (and neck warmer for winter camping)
  15. Digital watch with alarm
Living
  1. Tent (shared)
  2. Tent ground cover (shared - we used an emergency blanket)
  3. Thermarest (R 3.4 for sleeping on snow)
  4. Sleeping bag (good for -7C)
  5. Headlamp
  6. Hiking poles
  7. Extra baskets for poles (important for snow)
  8. Deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, dental floss, comb
  9. Ear plugs
  10. Lip chap, gum
  11. Sunscreen and lip sunscreen
  12. Hat
  13. Sunglasses
  14. Backpack rain cover
  15. Repair kit (for Thermarest, and tent - or just put duct tape on your hiking poles)
  16. Toilet paper
  17. Ziplock bags (although likely your food will be in these)
  18. Map (in ziplock bag) and compass
  19. Whistle
  20. Pen / paper
  21. Cards
  22. Book(s) - I brought an ereader with back light - really great!
First Aid Kit (homemade - based on Clever Hiker)
  1. Carabiner
  2. Pain/sleep/diarrhea
  3. Bandaids 
  4. Moleskin & second skin
  5. Antiseptic
  6. No stick gauze
  7. Sports tape
  8. Scissors
Winter Gear
  1. Large Down Jacket
  2. Down mitts
  3. Crampons
  4. Snow Shoes
  5. Ice Axe
Things to note: 
  • I rented my ice axe. Given the number of times I'll use it and the cost (cheap!) to rent, I opted for the rental.
  • I no longer wear hiking pants. They are too thin to provide any significant warmth, don't always allow you to move with as much flexibility, and the fabric/cut are generally quite unflattering. Leggings all the way.
  • Learning from my friend, having a change of clothes for 'night time' really improves comfort level and helps me feel warmer. Whenever we get into camp and have everything set up we would change out of our 'day clothes' and into our 'night clothes' - I would even take off my bra which really helped when it came time to go to bed!
  • Ear plugs (and I wish I would have had an eye mask) make sleeping in a tent 10x better! Especially with someone else / during the long summer days
  • I like to follow the rule: One item per I like having one of each, but no more than one of each.
  • I like to have my stuff compartmentalized, so I can just grab one larger bag out of my pack with say all of my kitchen stuff in it. Plus it makes me misplace stuff less. 
  • When in doubt, don't take it. The weight rarely out weights the comfort of having the item (minus things that keep you warm and full).
  • I watched a lot of Clever Hiker episodes on lightweight hiking (to help with my perpetual overpacking)
  • You can do it! We are so much more capable/adaptable/resilient than we think - and it's so much fun! 
Light packing helps on the ups!

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